Video game irritations- part 1

I have been a keen video game player for many years now, and I enjoy a variety of different styles of games. However, as the years have passed I have noticed a number of features being introduced to games that I find irritating.

Today I thought I’d mention a few of them, if only to get them off my chest.

Single player campaigns

Once a single player game in a FPS game, used to last for a considerable amount of time, 20+ hours, and in some cases more than 50 hours, this was good as it enabled a person to become invested in a character.

There are games where the single player campaign takes a considerable amount of time to get through, most notably role-playing games like Skyrim and strategy games like Age of Empires, but when it comes to FPS games, it seems as though there is little interest from the developers in making a lengthy single player campaign, they only care about multiplayer.

The campaigns in the Call of Duty series seem to last for no more than about six hours, if you are a competent player; no sooner do you get into the campaign than it’s over.

I enjoy FPS games, especially the Call of Duty series – there have been some great missions, such as ‘All Ghillied Up’ pictured

call-duty-all-ghillied
Perhaps the single best mission I’ve ever played – All Ghillied Up, CoD MW1

but I don’t like multiplayer, which leaves me with a bit of problem. For the price I have to pay for the games, it seems as though there is a massive lack of balance between single player and multiplayer.

Those who enjoy multiplayer get hundreds of hours of game play out of each Call of Duty title, and while I don’t expect anything like that, single-player is after all a different type of game entirely, I would like a more lengthy campaign that enables me to feel I have gotten value for my money.

I’m sure the developers will neither notice nor care about this post, but I think they should either do one of two things: create a more lengthy single-player campaign with better replayability, or provide a degree of separation between the single-player and multiplayer versions of the game, with both versions selling for a price and the combined version available for a better price than the two separately.

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